How many revenue streams to states get they forget to tell you and how do they divide the social security monies?

May 5, 2017 § Leave a comment

The young people and families involved with the Child Welfare Systems have ALWAYS been a passion of mine to make their lives better! Shared via one of the best child welfare consultants in the country! “A bipartisan bill to keep kids out of foster care is moving in Congress thanks to Sen. Ron Wyden’s (D-OR) dogged efforts:
House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady (R-TX) and Ranking Member Sander Levin (D-MI) and Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Ranking Member Ron Wyden (D-OR) Released a Draft of the Family First Prevention Services Act of 2016.
This afternoon the Chairman and Ranking Member of both the House Ways and Means Committee and the Senate Finance Committee released the Family First Prevention Services Act of 2016 and announced that the bill will be introduced in both the House and Senate in the coming days. This draft bill builds on and adds to provisions in the Family First Act, first developed by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Hatch and Ranking Member Wyden, and extends and updates other important child welfare provisions to help abused and neglected children that were expiring this year. It represents an historic step forward for vulnerable children and families and signals the continuing bipartisan and bicameral commitment of the House Ways and Means and Senate Finance Committees to work together to improve outcomes for children who come to the attention of the child welfare system.
Key provisions from the Family First Act that are included will help:
· Keep children at risk of foster care placement safely with parents or relatives by making federal funds available for mental health and substance abuse prevention and treatment services and in-home parent skill-based programs.
· Encourage the placement of children in foster care in the most family-like settings appropriate to their special needs.
The Family First Prevention and Services Act also includes a number of new provisions, including:
· Offers additional support for relative caregivers by allowing a federal match for evidence-based Kinship Navigator programs to help children remain safely with family members and requiring states to document how their foster care licensing standards accommodate relative caregivers.
· Addresses the recent spike in out-of-home placements due to the opioid and heroin epidemic by reauthorizing and updating the Regional Partnership Grant (RPG) program, which funds state and regional grantees seeking to provide evidence-based services to prevent child maltreatment related to substance abuse.
· Amends the John H. Chafee Foster Care Independence Program to allow states to continue to assist former foster youth up to age 23, and to extend eligibility for education and training vouchers to youth to age 26.
· Encourages permanence for children by reducing unnecessary delays by encouraging states to use electronic interstate case-processing systems to help expedite the interstate placement of children in foster care, adoption or guardianship.
· Extends for five years (FY2017 – FY2021) the Title IV-B Promoting Safe and Stable Families and Child Welfare Services programs.
· Extends for five years (FY2017 – FY2021) the Adoption and Legal Guardianship Incentive Payment program.
· Takes steps, including requiring a GAO Report, to ensure states are reinvesting state dollars freed up by making additional children eligible for Title IV-E Adoption Assistance payments and postpones for 2 ½ years the Title IV-E Adoption Assistance “de-link” for the adoptions of infants and toddlers.
Please let Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady and Ranking Member Sander Levin and Human Resources Subcommittee Chair Vern Buchanan and Ranking Member Lloyd Doggett and Senate Finance Committee Chair Orrin Hatch and Ranking Member Ron Wyden know of your organization’s support for the Family First Prevention Services Bill.
Please click here for the press release from the House Ways and Means Committee on this important bill. The Ways and Means Committee also developed a three-page summary of the Family First Prevention Services Act.
The Children’s Defense Fund is also developing a longer summary of the bill and will share that soon with the Coalition. We will also circulate an announcement for an upcoming Coalition meeting sometime next week to review the bill and discuss next steps.
A list of various Titles and Sections in the bill (and page numbers) are below for your convenience.
THE FAMILY FIRST PREVENTION AND SERVICES ACT
TITLE I—INVESTING IN PREVENTION AND FAMILY SERVICES (p. 3)
Subtitle A—Prevention Activities Under Title IV–E (p. 4)
Sec. 111. Foster care prevention services and programs. (p. 4)
Sec. 112. Foster care maintenance payments for children with parents in a licensed residential family-based treatment facility for substance abuse. (p. 35)
Sec. 113. IV–E payments for evidence-based kinship navigator programs. (p. 38)
Subtitle B—Enhanced Support Under Title IV–B (p. 39)
Sec. 121. Elimination of time limit for family reunification services while in foster care and permitting time-limited family reunification services when a child returns home from foster care. (p. 39)
Sec. 122. Reducing bureaucracy and unnecessary delays when placing children in homes across State lines. (p. 40)
Sec. 123. Enhancements to grants to improve well-being of families affected by substance abuse. (p. 45)
Subtitle C—Miscellaneous (p. 54)
Sec. 131. Reviewing and improving licensing standards for placement in a relative foster family home. (p. 54)
Sec. 132. Development of a statewide plan to prevent child abuse and neglect fatalities. (p. 56)
Sec. 133. Modernizing the title and purpose of title IV–E. (p. 57)
Sec. 134. Effective dates. (p. 57)
TITLE II—ENSURING THE NECESSITY OF A PLACEMENT THAT IS NOT IN A FOSTER FAMILY HOME(p. 59)
Sec. 201. Limitation on Federal financial participation for placements that are not in foster family homes. (p. 60)
Sec. 202. Assessment and documentation of the need for placement in a qualified residential treatment program. (p. 70)
Sec. 203. Protocols to prevent inappropriate diagnoses. (p. 78)
Sec. 204. Additional data and reports regarding children placed in a setting that is not a foster family home. (p. 79)
Sec. 205. Effective dates; application to waivers. (p. 81)
TITLE III—CONTINUING SUPPORT FOR CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES (p. 82)
Sec. 301. Supporting and retaining foster families for children. (p. 82)
Sec. 302. Extension of child and family services programs. (p. 83)
Sec. 303. Improvements to the John H. Chafee foster care independence program and related provisions. (p. 84)
TITLE IV—CONTINUING INCENTIVES TO STATES TO PROMOTE ADOPTION AND LEGAL GUARDIANSHIP (p. 93)
Sec. 401. Reauthorizing adoption and legal guardianship incentive programs. (p. 94)
TITLE V—TECHNICAL CORRECTIONS (p. 94)
Sec. 501. Technical corrections to data exchange standards to improve program coordination. (p. 94)
Sec. 502. Technical corrections to State requirement to address the developmental needs of young children. (p. 96)
TITLE VI—ENSURING STATES REINVEST SAVINGS RESULTING FROM INCREASE IN ADOPTION ASSISTANCE (p. 97)
Sec. 601. Delay of adoption assistance phase-in. (p. 97)
Sec. 602. GAO study and report on State reinvestment of savings resulting from increase in adoption assistance. (p. 98)”‘

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